A preliminary study of cigarette smoking in female orofacial pain patients.

TitleA preliminary study of cigarette smoking in female orofacial pain patients.
Publication TypeJournal Article
JournalBehavioral medicine (Washington, D.C.)
Volume39
Issue3
Pagination73-9
Date Published2013
ISSN0896-4289
Abstract

The relationship between behavior (eg, diet, exercise, substance use) and the functioning of chronic-pain patients, including orofacial-pain patients, is poorly understood. This preliminary study examined cigarette smoking and both pain-related and psychological functioning in female orofacial-pain patients. Correlates of intentions to quit smoking were also explored. There were 48 participants in this cross-sectional study. Smokers reported significantly less self-control over pain (d = .66), lower general activity levels (d = .52), more fatigue (d = .80), and poorer sleep quality (d = .53) than non-smokers. The mean effect size for all dependent variables was .49 (range, .33-.80) with the smallest and largest effect found for negative mood and fatigue, respectively. More positive attitudes toward smoking cessation independently predicted stronger intentions to quit (β = .52, p = .03). Findings suggest smoking is significantly associated with pain-related and psychological functioning in female orofacial-pain patients. Smoking-cessation treatment for these patients should include motivational interviewing techniques directed toward attitudinal change.

URLhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08964289.2012.731439
DOI10.1080/08964289.2012.731439
Short TitleBehav Med
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