passport

Year of Europe Film Screening: An Unforgettable Summer (Romania)

Date: 
Thursday, October 8, 2015 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
WT Young Auditorium

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Year of Europe Film Screening: The Class (France)

"The Class" will be presented and discussed with / by Professor Leon Sachs of French.

For more information visit:  http://libguides.uky.edu/eurofilm

Date: 
Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
WT Young Auditorium

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Arabic Cultural Night

Date: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 5:00pm
Location: 
Small Ballroom of the Student Center

Religion, Identity and Competing Visions of Islam in Post-Soviet Central Asia

For several decades, studying Islam in Central Asia meant beginning with questions, analytical categories, and conceptual frameworks rooted in Soviet and Russian studies; this approach, combined with a lack of basic understanding of the historical experience of Central Asian Muslims prior to the Soviet era, led to host of misconceptions surrounding the character of Muslim religious life in the Soviet era, the impact of Soviet policies and realities, and trends in the renegotiation of religious identities in the post-Soviet age.  Recent years have brought, in some circles, growing awareness of the need for approaches drawn from Islamic studies and from a  historically-grounded understanding of the history of Muslim religiosity in Central Asia.  This lecture will discuss some of the misconceptions rooted in the ‘Sovietological’ approach to Islam in the region, and the lessons to be drawn from viewing the region through the lens of Islamic studies, with a particular focus on the ways in which religiosity was manifested in Soviet times, and on the ways in which religiosity shaped or interacted with notions of ‘national’ identity.

Date: 
Friday, March 27, 2015 - 3:00pm
Location: 
Room 249 of the Student Center

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Year of The Middle East Finale: Divahn

Divahn features the Middle Eastern and Sephardic Jewish Music of Galeet Dardashti.

http://www.divahn.com/ 

Iranian-descended singer Galeet Dardashti leads Divahn's edgy all-female power-house ensemble. The group has engendered an international following, performing in venues ranging from international concert halls to the most prestigious clubs in NYC. Infusing traditional and original Middle Eastern Jewish songs with sophisticated harmonies, entrancing improvisations, and funky arrangements, Divahn's thrilling live shows feature lush string arrangements, eclectic Indian, Middle Eastern, and Latin percussion, and vocals spanning Hebrew, Judeo-Spanish, Persian, Arabic, and Aramaic. “Divan,” a word common to Hebrew, Persian, and Arabic, means a collection of songs or poetry. Through their music, the group creatively underscores common ground between diverse Middle Eastern cultures and religion.

 

Date: 
Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Center Theater

"Sleepless Nights/Wasted Time: Seeking Islam in Egypt's Hollywood"

Professor Joel Gordon will explore the depiction of ‘normative’ religious practices and personal expressions of religious identity in recent Egyptian movies with a particular focus is on Egyptian youth.  Whereas in the past signs of piety had been restricted to either ‘traditional’ Egyptians – often in comic fashion – or political extremists, a few recent films have dared to depict ‘normal’ veiled women and bearded men and even a social environment in which questions of piety, morality and proper behavior dominate the discussions, concerns and conflicts between young Egyptians.  These films may point to a growing willingness by film artists to honestly explore social trends that have been taboo, especially as Egypt enters a new political era.

Prof. Joel Gordon: Professor of History and Director of Middle East Studies, University of Arkansas; Specialist in modern Egyptian history and Arab popular culture; Author of Nasser' Blessed Movement, Revolutionary Melodrama, and Nasser: Hero of the Arab Nation

 
Date: 
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
UKAA Auditorium @ WT Young Library

John L. Esposito - The Future of Islam

One of the most respected American scholarly authority on Islam, John L. Esposito, visited the University of Kentucky Wednesday, September 10, 2014, to discuss “The Future of Islam: Assessing the Elements of Reform, Revival, and Fundamentalism in the Muslim World,” at the Singletary Center Recital Hall.

The event was part of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Passport to the World 2014-15 program Year of the Middle East: Crossroads of the World.

A professor of Islamic Studies and International Affairs at Georgetown University, Esposito discussed his book on the portrait of Islam today and tomorrow, drawn by a lifetime of thought and research to sweep away the negative stereotypes of the fastest growing religion in the world. Esposito’s interviews and articles with newspapers, magazines, and the media in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East: The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Economist, The Guardian, The Times of London, CNN, ABC Nightline, CBS, NBC and the BBC.

The Middle East: Crossroads of the World

This year's Passport to the World will engage the campus community in crucial global conversations through public lectures, cultural events, coursework and travel opportunities.

“The Arab World and American Democracy”

“Specters of War” examines the influence of post-9/11 American military interventions in the Middle East on the production of both American and Arab literature. Focusing on images of ghosts, spectral illusions, the undead and the undying, the talk attempts to locate zones of inter-textual contact where contemporary American and Arab literary voices move past mutual redactions and engage one another’s respective cultural realities. The goal is to both introduce Arab literary voices into the conversation about America’s presence in the Middle East and to interrogate the haunting presence of the Middle East in contemporary American literature.  Works discussed will include Ali Bader’s The Tobacco Keeper, Hassan Blasim’s The Corpse Experiment and Other Stories of Iraq, Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s Guantanamo Diary, Theo Padnos’s “My Captivity,” Phil Klay’s Redployment, and Ross Ritchell’s The Knife.

Date: 
Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
The Niles Gallery

“The Arab Spring: The Youth Revolts of the Arab World Aren't Over

The youth revolts of 2011 and after in the Arab world have permanently changed the face of the region.  While most observers have mainly interpreted them through the lens of high politics, this talk argues that the big story here is the rise of a new generation of young Arabs, the Millennials, who have innovated in grassroots organization (including, but not limited to new ways of using social media for politics).  It is too soon to know thow he political struggles that they initiated will end.  But it is certain that a new generation, with distinctive values and aspirations, has announced its arrival on the scene.
 

Date: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 7:00pm
Location: 
UKAA Auditorium @ W.T. Young Library

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